Addendum: mysql2 ruby gem and Mac OS X: image not found

Back at the start of April I wrote mysql2 ruby gem and Mac OS X: image not found to deal with the extremely relative path to libmysqlclient.16.dylib. I had said I would prefer not putting libmysqlclient.16.dylib in /usr/lib but I couldn’t find a dylib path that ruby uses. That is until today when I decided to try again.

I found libexecdir in RbConfig::CONFIG which is the directory where ruby can load dylib files from.

libexecdir=$(ruby -rrbconfig -e 'puts RbConfig::CONFIG["libexecdir"]')
sudo mkdir -p $libexecdir
sudo ln -s /usr/local/mysql/lib/libmysqlclient.16.dylib $libexecdir

Now ruby can load libmysqlclient.16.dylib without putting it in /usr/lib.

I forgot to mention it in the first post but if your ruby wants libmysqlclient.18.dylib, just replace the 16 with 18. Same with any other number.

mysql2 ruby gem and Mac OS X: image not found

If you are using the mysql2 ruby gem on Mac OS X you may have run into this problem before.

> require 'mysql2'
LoadError: dlopen(mysql2-0.2.7/lib/mysql2/mysql2.bundle, 9):
  Library not loaded: libmysqlclient.16.dylib
  Referenced from: mysql2-0.2.7/lib/mysql2/mysql2.bundle
  Reason: image not found - mysql2-0.2.7/lib/mysql2/mysql2.bundle

So far the only solution I have found online is to use install_name_tool to update the (extremely) relative libmysqlclient.16.dylib reference to be absolute (usually to /usr/local/mysql/lib/libmysqlclient.16.dylib).

While this solves the problem, it only works until you reinstall the mysql2 gem or install a newer version and then you have to do it again. To permanently solve it you need to create a symlink of libmysqlclient.16.dylib to /usr/lib so that it can be found with that default relative path.

Ideally you wouldn’t put it in /usr/lib but I haven’t be able to find a path inside of ruby that will let you load the dylib.

sudo ln -s /usr/local/mysql/lib/libmysqlclient.16.dylib /usr/lib

Enter your password and then you can use the mysql2 gem without needing to edit the compiled bundle afterwards.

Store your git https passwords in your OS X Keychain

Around this time last year git added a “smart” HTTP transport that is faster than the old HTTP transport (and in some cases faster than SSH too). And a few months later GitHub added support for this new HTTP transport and made it the default selected url for repositories (that you aren’t a contributor for).

There aren’t any major advantages using https over ssh to access your GitHub repositories, it’s just more simple to use your username/password instead of adding your ssh key. The only other advantages is that it’s easier to set up HTTP proxy for git (git config --global http.proxy proxy:8080 vs ssh config) and being able to use more than one GitHub account (which you shouldn’t since anyone can add you as a contributor to a project).

One major disadvantage is that it asks you for your username/password each time you interact with your remote repository (clone, pull, push, etc). To solve this, I decided to write a program that stores your username and/or password in your keychain so git will ask once for you username/password and retrieve it later so you don’t have to type it again. If you only want the program, skip to it.

Continue reading Store your git https passwords in your OS X Keychain